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Configuring Your Laptop to Use DHCP

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    Network (IP) addresses are assigned to laptop computers using the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). DHCP automatically configures all required network settings.

    To use DHCP at LCO, you must first register the MAC addresses of your machine. This applies to all visitors at LCO, not just at Magellan. We request that you register your machine at least four days in advance of your visit, to be sure that you will be ready to plug into the network when you arrive at LCO. You need to register only once for each MAC address regardless of the number of subsequent visits to LCO. DHCP works at the El Pino office as well as on the mountain top.

    To register just go to: 

    http://www.ctio.noao.edu/noao/node/add/network-connection
    You will be asked to submit the following information:
    1. Your full name.
    2. Your permanent email address.
    3. The hardware address of all your laptop's network interfaces (e.g - both wireless and ethernet).

    After submitting the form, you will receive a return email to confirm registration.

    Other network information can be found at: http://dns1.lco.cl/pub/slash/etc/hosts
    Do not self-assign IP numbers.
The hardware (MAC) address of your ethernet or wireless card is a 48-bit number that will appear as six pairs of hexidecimal digits (e.g. 0-9 or A-F) and is usually separated by colons (:) or sometimes dashes (-) on computers running Microsoft operating systems.

A typical example might look like 00:90:27:D0:AF:D5. A number like 192.168.0.4, which has four sets of number separated by periods, is of course the IP number which is a different beast entirely.

Sometimes the number may be written on the card, or in the case of an internal interface, on the back of the laptop itself.

Linux:

    Run "/sbin/ifconfig -a". The ethernet address is the number by HWaddr in the eth0 information. The number may also be found in /etc/sysconfig/hwconf.

Windows 95/98/ME:

    Run the command winipcfg. The ethernet address is listed in the window that appears as "adapter address".

    Make sure that you have selected your ethernet card in the drop down list (there may be PPP entries for example).

Windows NT:

  1. Right click "Network Neighborhood" and select "Properties"
  2. Click the "Adapters" tab
  3. Click "Properties". The number appears (without colons) next to "Ethernet address".

Windows 2000:

  1. Run "winmsd"
  2. Open "components", "network", then "adapter"
  3. Locate your network adapter in the list that is displayed. The number appears next to "MAC Address"

Windows XP:

  1. From the start menu select: Control Panel -> Network and Internet Connections -> Network Connections -> Local Area Connection
  2. Click the "support" tab
  3. Click "details" The number appears next to "Physical address".

MacOS 8.0-9.2:

  1. Open the TCP/IP control (Apple Menu -> Control Panels -> TCP/IP)
  2. Click on the "info" button and read the "hardware address". If no "info" button appears in the TCP/IP control panel, pull down the Edit Menu -> User Mode and select "advanced"... Now the "info" button should appear.

MacOS X:

  1. Open the Network Preferences (Apple Menu -> Location -> Network Preferences)
  2. On the "Show:" drop menu select Built-in Ethernet. The Ethernet Address: field is your hardware address.

 

3. Configuring your Laptop to use DHCP

 

The following procedures will configure your computer to run DHCP. Reboot your computer for the changes to take effect.

Linux:

As root run netconfig (or redhat-config-network or equivalent). On the second screen select "Use dynamic IP configuration (BOOTP/DHCP)" using the space bar and tab to select "OK". No other settings or changes are necessary.

Windows 95/98/ME:

  1. From the start menu select: Settings -> Control Panel
  2. Double-click the "Network" control panel.
  3. Select the "Configuration" tab.
  4. Double-click the "TCP/IP" component for your ethernet adapter (not the dial-up adapter or AOL adapter if you have those).
  5. On the "IP Address" tab check the box for "Obtain an IP Address automatically".
  6. Select the "Gateway" tab. If any address appears under "Installed gateways" select it and click "Remove".

Windows NT:

  1. From the start menu select: Settings -> Control Panel
  2. Click the "Network" control panel
  3. Select the "Protocol" tab
  4. Select "TCP/IP" and click "Properties"
  5. Select "Obtain an IP address from a DHCP Service"

Windows 2000:

  1. From the start menu select: Settings -> Network and Dial-up Connections -> Local Area Connection
  2. Click the "Properties"
  3. Select "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)"
  4. Click "Properties"
  5. Check the boxes for "Obtain an IP Address automatically" and "Obtain DNS server address automatically". The other boxes should gray-out.

Windows XP:

  1. From the start menu select Control Panel -> Network and Internet Connections -> Network Connections -> Local Area Connection
  2. Click the "Properties"
  3. Select "Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)"
  4. Click "Properties"
  5. Check the boxes for "Obtain an IP Address automatically" and "Obtain DNS server address automatically". The other boxes should gray-out.

MacOS:

  1. Open the TCP/IP control (Apple Menu -> Control Panels -> TCP/IP)
  2. Set the "Connect via:" selection to "Ethernet built-in"
  3. Set the "Configure:" selection to "Using DHCP Server". All other fields should be blank.
  4. Close the TCP/IP control panel.
  5. Click "Save".

MacOS X:

  1. From the Apple Menu choose "System Preferences" then "Network"
  2. Select the "TCP/IP" tab.
  3. Set the "Configure:" selection to "Built-in Ethernet".
  4. Set the "Configure:" selection to "Using DHCP".
  5. Add "lco.cl" to the "Search Domains" field.
  6. Close the TCP/IP control panel.
  7. Click "Save".
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